5 Steps To Build A Better Breakfast

Start your day with these good-for-you breakfast choices.

What you eat in the morning can influence how you eat and feel throughout the rest of the day. That’s why starting your day with a good breakfast is a great way to get your day off to a good start.

Here are 5 ways to make your breakfast heathier:

  1. Get your protein. Want to stay full until lunch and eat better all day? Eat enough protein at breakfast. Research published in the International Journal of Obesity showed that people who had a protein-packed breakfast ate 26% fewer calories at lunch than those who ate the same number of calories but had less protein. Good choices include eggs or egg whites, low-fat dairy such as cottage cheese or Greek yogurt, a breakfast burrito with beans or high-protein cereal with milk.
  2. Eat your veggies. Why not start your day with some low-calorie, high-fiber foods loaded with vitamins and minerals? Add spinach and tomatoes to your omelet for some vitamin A, C, E and K. Put kale in your breakfast smoothie to up your lutein intake and protect your eyes.
  3. Don’t forget whole-grains. By adding fiber to your morning meal, you’ll feel fuller longer. The fiber will also help keep your digestive system running smoothly and may help lower cholesterol and blood pressure. Opt for whole-grain bread (3+g fiber/slice), high-fiber cereal (5+g fiber/serving) or other fiber-rich grains such as barley, quinoa or oats.
  4. Add a dose of healthy fat. Including some monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat in your morning meal can give your breakfast staying power. Sprinkle 1 – 2 tablespoons of nuts on your cereal or yogurt. Mash ¼ of an avocado on whole-grain toast. Or use a teaspoon of olive oil to cook veggies for your omelet.
  5. Limit added sugar. Adding a piece of fruit to your morning meal can be a tasty way to up the fiber, vitamins and antioxidants. But avoid a sugar-filled breakfast that can set you up for a blood glucose rollercoaster ride. Skip the fruit juice, sugar-sweetened cereal or bakery muffin.

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Date Last Reviewed: July 16, 2019

Editorial Review: Andrea Cohen, Editorial Director, Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Contact Editor

Medical Review: Nora Minno, RD, CDN

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