Why Get A Vaccine If I Can Still Get COVID-19?

Vaccines protect you from serious illness, even if they don’t stop the spread of the delta variant.

COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations are quickly rising again across the country, mostly due to the delta variant of the virus. This variant is not only proving to be extremely contagious, but it is spreading among fully vaccinated people and children.

People who have not been vaccinated account for 97% of those hospitalized. Children and teens are also being hospitalized due to the virus more than ever before. This is concerning as schools reopen with in-person learning. Children under 12, who are not yet eligible for the vaccine, are not only carriers of the virus, but they are contracting it.

How effective is the vaccine when it comes to the delta variant?

Although being vaccinated may not completely stop you from getting the delta variant, most vaccinated people don’t develop serious symptoms—or any at all. According to recent data from the CDC, 99.99% of fully vaccinated people have not had a breakthrough case of COVID-19 resulting in hospitalization or death. But evidence shows that vaccinated people may have a similar amount of virus in their body as those who are unvaccinated. This means they can still spread the virus to others if they get it, even though they likely won’t get very sick themselves.

Why get the shot?

The delta variant is so contagious that some health officials speculate that most people who are not fully vaccinated or have not had a previous COVID-19 infection will likely get it. That means that the best way to protect yourself from getting seriously ill from the virus is to be fully vaccinated.

More than 100 million people in the U.S. are still unvaccinated. Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, recently told ABC News that it is more important than ever to get vaccinated against COVID-19. “When you look at the country as a whole, and getting us back to normal, the unvaccinated…are allowing the propagation and the spread of the outbreak, which ultimately impacts everybody.”

What if I’m still unsure about getting vaccinated?

You may still have questions about the COVID-19 vaccine and that’s understandable. Doing research about the shot may help ease your concerns, but it’s important to get your information from trusted resources because there is a lot of misinformation out there.

Here’s what the CDC says about getting the shot:

  • Although some fully vaccinated people will still contract the virus, the vaccine has been shown to provide strong protection against severe illness, hospitalization and death among people of all ages.
  • A small percentage of people may get COVID-19 soon after vaccination because the body has not had enough time to build full protection. It’s important to take precautions for the first few weeks after receiving it.
  • If you get a vaccine that requires two doses, you need the second dose in order to be fully protected.

Vaccination is the best protection we have against developing serious illness from COVID-19, including the very contagious delta variant. Whether or not you are vaccinated, wearing a mask in public, social distancing and washing your hands provide added protection against getting the virus and spreading it to others.

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Date Last Reviewed: August 4, 2021

Editorial Review: Andrea Cohen, Editorial Director, Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Contact Editor

Medical Review: Perry Pitkow, MD

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